Court Docket – Police nab fake handgun during arrest

H.P. court docket
Oct. 24, 2016
Judge M.B. Golden
A 40-year-old man was ordered to still pay restitution of more than $600 even though the deadline passed from a court order.
Gregory Jason Anderson was fined $400, plus a victim surcharge of $120, each on two counts of breaching probation when he appeared in High Prairie provincial court Oct. 24.
Anderson breached probation when he failed to pay restitution of $625.65 to Sucker Creek First Nation for damages by a deadline at the end of September.
His second breach offence occurred when he failed to report to his probation officer as required by law, said Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich.
“They can enforce that restitution in any way,” said Judge M.B. Golden.
The judge converted the restitution order into a judgment enforced civilly, to authorize Sucker Creek First Nation to receive the full restitution from Anderson.
“He acknowledges he didn’t pay the restitution,” duty counsel Bruce Maunder said.

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Arnold G. Yatchotay was fined $1,000, plus a victim fine surcharge of $300, after pleading guilty to care and control of a vehicle while intoxicated.
“Police found him asleep, passed out, in the driver’s seat of a vehicle in a ditch,” Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich told court.
When he was tested at the police station, Yatchotay’s breath samples measured 100 mg, barely over the legal limit of 80.
Yatchotay was co-operative with police, Hurich added.
Yatchotay was automatically suspended from driving a vehicle for one year.

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Vincent Tallman, 47, of Atikameg, was fined $100 for failing to comply with an undertaking and $100 for failing to appear in court.
He was found “heavily intoxicated” near Mac’s convenience store on April 13, thereby breaching a court order to abstain from consuming alcohol, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich said.
Rather than pay the surcharges of $30 and $45, Judge M.B. Golden decided Tallman’s appearance in court was sufficient as one day in jail for not paying the surcharges.
“Mr. Tallman has missed a few court dates,” Hurich said.
Tallman recognizes he has a drinking problem.
“He was so drunk, he couldn’t remember the incident,” said Cheryl Kachuk, criminal court worker for Native Counselling Services of Alberta.
“He knows he shouldn’t have been drinking.”

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Lawrence R. Travis, 29, was sentenced to 33 days in jail, with credit for full time served, after pleading guilty to two counts of failing to comply with an undertaking and one count for carrying a concealed weapon.
“There will also be a weapons prohibition for a period of two years,” declared Judge M.B. Golden.
Travis breached orders that prohibited him from possessing weapons. When police responded to a phone call from his mother at the family residence, they found a knife and a fake handgun in his possession, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich said.
Travis already had two separate orders for a prohibition of weapons, his lawyer Allan Crawford said.
“He had a knife on him when he was arrested,” he said.
Travis was passed out on a bed when police arrived and arrested him, added Hurich.

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Amy Lea Thunder, of Atikameg, was sentenced to eight days in jail, with full credit for time served, on two counts of failing to comply with an undertaking.
Thunder breached two separate orders to abstain from consuming alcohol, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich told court.
“You can’t be consuming alcohol,” Judge M.B. Golden said.
“You may not be fortunate next time.”
While Thunder is able to control alcohol while at home, she is challenged when she is in High Prairie, her lawyer said.
“She has real trouble keeping it together when she comes to town,” said Allan Crawford.

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George B. Coutrie, 49, of High Prairie, was sentenced to seven days in jail, with full credit for time served, after pleading guilty to breach of probation.
He was found intoxicated by High Prairie Pawn Shop on Oct. 18, thereby breaching a court order to abstain from alcohol.
“Police observed him drinking behind the building,” Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich said.
“He does have a lengthy record, he is an alcoholic,” lawyer Harry Jong said.

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