Woman one of first to feel wrath of new law

H.P. court docket
March 25, 2019
Judge D.R. Shynkar

A McLennan woman is one of the first to receive a stiffer penalty after pleading guilty to drunk driving in High Prairie provincial court March 25.
Dawn Dafoe, 40, was fined $2,000 for driving a vehicle with a blood alcohol content over 80 mg.
In fining Dafoe, Judge D.R. Shynkar noted the fines for impaired driving in the Criminal Code recently increased.
“Under new legislation, the minimum fine for a reading over 160 is $2,000,” he says.
Dafoe recorded a breath sample of 160 mg after she was stopped by High Prairie RCMP on Jan. 12, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich told court.
“Police saw a vehicle driving erratically.”
Duty counsel Harry Jong appeared in court and spoke for Dafoe. He first told court Dafoe and her boyfriend went out drinking alcohol.
“Her boyfriend was in no condition to drive, so she took over the driving,” Jong said.
In addition to the fine, Dafoe was also suspended from driving for one year.

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Joseph Tyler Belcourt, 19, of Driftpile, was fined $400 after pleading guilty one count of breaching conditions and two counts of failing to comply with conditions.
The charges arose after Belcourt left home and violated his curfew. Police arrived at his home Jan. 4 around 11:13 p.m., Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich said.
Belcourt was on a curfew from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.
“Police were informed he was in High Prairie playing hockey,” Hurich said.
Belcourt also failed twice to report to his bail supervisor resulting in two more charges.
“He did eventually call,” Hurich said.
Belcourt claimed he lost the card and phone number of his bail supervisor, duty counsel Harry Jong told court.

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Cheyenne B. Giroux, 27, of Driftpile, was sentenced to probation for six months after pleading guilty to mischief and damage under $5,000.
Court heard she smashed the front windshield of a vehicle owned by her sister.
Duty counsel Harry Jong appeared in court with Giroux. He told court Giroux retaliated after her sister smashed a bottle over her head during an argument.
“She used a stick,” Jong said.
Giroux was taken to hospital with injuries.
Both sisters were intoxicated at the time.
Giroux must keep the peace during her probation.

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Tyson Trey Thomas, 21, of High Prairie, was fined a total of $900 after pleading guilty to several charges.
However, Thomas won’t have to pay any of the fines.
“I give you credit for time spent in jail,” Judge D.R. Shynkar said.
Thomas spent nine days in custody.
Thomas was fined $200 each on counts of possessing stolen property and interfering with property, and $100 each on five counts of failing to appear in court.
Thomas’ legal problems began when he stole four cell phones from the High Prairie Sports Palace and broke into a vehicle on another occasion, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich said.
Thomas was trying to steal the vehicle, he alleged.
Court heard Thomas has a lengthy criminal record, although his last conviction was in 2016.
Thomas admitted his crimes.
“He says it’s a stupid thing what he’s doing,” duty counsel Harry Jong said.

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David Shawn Schooley, 48, of Okotoks, AB was fined $1,000 after pleading guilty to unlawful possession of wildlife under the Alberta Wildlife Act.
Schooley killed a white-tailed deer on Swan River First Nation land without proper permission, Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich alleged.
“He needed permission from the band council,” Judge D.R. Shynkar noted.
The accused admitted his crime.
“I made a mistake.”
Alberta Fish and Wildlife officers responded to a report of a hunter illegally hunting and found the accused.
Schooley, who admitted he did not have permission, claimed someone told him he could hunt on the land.
“It was on the edge of the reserve, there were no signs and no fence,” said duty counsel Harry Jong, who spoke for Schooley in court.
Schooley was also automatically suspended from hunting for two years.

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Arthur W. Bowen, 38, of Prince George, B.C., was fined $500 for hunting wildlife without a legal licence under the Alberta Wildlife Act.
“He was hunting with a licence as an Alberta resident,” Crown prosecutor Petter Hurich told court.
Bowen admitted he killed a white-tailed deer in the Salt Prairie area.
“He thought he could hunt with that licence,” duty counsel Harry Jong told court.
Bowen resided in Sherwood Park, AB before he moved out of the province to British Columbia.
During sentencing, Bowen was reminded to have a legal licence.
“Pay attention next time,” Judge D.R. Shynkar said.
In addition to the fine, Bowen was automatically suspended from hunting for two years.

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